Thank you for stopping in. Your interest in my writing means the world. If you have not read my work, please visit my BOOKS page for more details. If you have read SOULED OUT, FRAYED, or TIN MOON, please leave a review online and be sure to tell a friend. Your voice matters more than anything. Word-of-mouth and reviews are the most important ways for authors to be discovered by new readers.

Thank you for taking time to stop in and learn more about me. You are wonderful!

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Audio A-Go-Go: Struck

I have not had a lot of time to read lately, but I have found a way around that: Audio books!

Luckily, I'm able to listen to audio books occasionally at work. Because I highly believe that reviews are invaluable, I absolutely want to share them with you. Maybe you will discover a new favorite.

So here is the latest:

Struck by Jennifer Bosworth

Struck is about Mia, a seventeen-year-old who is addicted to being struck by lightning. That is what hooked me. Lightning is crazy. Being addicted to it is crazier. Add to that a post-apocalyptic LA that has been ravaged by natural disasters. Of course, no disaster is complete without a cult and a secret society of sorts.

Bosworth described Mia's world very well. The "displaced", those who lost their homes during the disasters, and their almost feral demeanor at times born from fear and desperation, felt authentic. Everywhere Mia looked, loss upon loss. Her own world, consisting of her mother and brother, was not without its own type of loss. Her mother is suffering from a sort of PTSD from being trapped under the rubble, almost killed. Mia and her brother return to school only for the daily food rations promised to every attending student. And prices are so inflated that a few dollars won't even buy a loaf of bread. Mia even has to take her chances with a drug dealer for her mother's medication rather than buying them legally.

So what is going on in this horrible wasteland of a town? Well, the end of the world is coming. Some are aligning themselves with Prophet, the blind bible-thumper, eager to ring in the end of the world. Others are part of a group hoping to stop Prophet and his people from creating a storm that could do just that, end all. You see, there are others who have been hit by lightning, not just Mia. And it has left its mark on them in more ways than the visible red scars. They have power. And the more power Prophet collects, the more likely his plan will work. He only needs one more: Mia.

While Mia's world is well thought out and the storyline pretty solid, it began to waffle toward the end. Jeremy is the wild card of the story. He pops out of nowhere, a foe turned love interest. And though I appreciate his complicated backstory, he turned into a distraction for Mia. Almost as if this broken world only needed love to save it rather than a crusader with the capability to harness the power of lightning. With such a hefty world view set up, I can only feel that Bosworth missed her chance to impart some wisdom to Mia's plight, to relay a deeper message to the reader.

Unless that, in fact, was the deeper message: A broken world only needs love to save it.

If anyone has read or listened to Struck, I would love to hear your theories.

If you haven't been Struck, you can:

I'm sure you can find it in many places in many forms, but I feel that two links is acceptable. ;D

As a reminder: I write honest reviews based solely on my own dorky opinions.  

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Forgetfulness Has a Season

Sometimes I forget how to write. Or so I think. That's how it feels, anyway. I get lost in the world, in my head. I live and love, and experience so much away from my computer and paper. It's wonderful to be "here" in the moment rather than "there". To not be accountable on social media. To not worry about updates or word counts.

I take pleasure in the little things. I take time to grieve the big things. With everything, I take my time.

But then my brain wants to make sense of it all. It wants to piece it all together, string it to my heart and back. Only, in order to do that I have to remember how to write again because it is how I process the world. And it feels just as wonderful to write as it does, during those times of forgetfulness, not to. 

Forgetfulness has a season, but every season has an end. And ends are just as important as beginnings because sometimes they are the same thing.

So maybe I'm back for a time. To write and chat and piece the world together.